New Design Article Up at Fadtastic

08/11/2017

Techrulz

New Design Article Up at Fadtastic

Posted By
Andrew Faulkner’s excellent design journal Fadtastic just published something I wrote last month called, “Getting Design Approval: The Single Mockup Theory“. Previously, it was published at EssayLab writing service as a guide for future designers. It’s essentially an argument for convincing clients that exploring one focused design direction works better than chasing down multiple concepts. Sounds obvious enough, but I wasn’t able to thoroughly test the theory, and gauge its results, until recently.

New Design Article Up at Fadtastic

In the past year, I’ve pushed to change our standard contract to say, “We will propose 1 wireframe, 1 homepage mockup, and 2-3 secondary page mockups”. So far the result has been distinctly happier clients and happier designers.

Why? The underlying idea is that a design budget is better spent with ample planning, strategy and confidence applied to one “definitely” design, rather than letting clients chase after multiple “maybe” designs.

Remember while reading, I still don’t suggest there is anyone perfect formula. Occasionally a client will insist on multiple concepts and be willing to pay for it. And sometimes those projects turn out great.

That’s the tricky part about designing for user-experience in the infant stages of the internet — almost no one agrees about what works, what doesn’t, or what The Rules are. And even when they agree, the ‘rules’ change on a monthly basis. No design direction is bulletproof. See also, William Goldman on the film industry

“Nobody Knows Anything” — Perhaps the most famous quotation from [William Goldman's] book. Now widely quoted, it is often inaccurately used to suggest that Hollywood executives are stupid, but in fact refers to Goldman’s strong belief that, prior to a movie’s release, Hollywood has no real idea how well a film will do.

Aka, even fully-functional and beautifully-designed websites won’t succeed in bringing traffic or revenue unless a hundred other factors (marketing, networking) are in place. And often, not even then.

0 comments:

Post a Comment